HELP!! transmission problem

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curvesman
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HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by curvesman » Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:45 am

Found out I need a new power glide Transmission axle bearing wore out tranny! what year transmission can I install in my 1964 Monza convertible. looking to buy one.
Thanks in advance

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terribleted
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by terribleted » Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:40 pm

Not sure what a transmission axle bearing might be. Not sure if you really need a transmission or a differential (maybe called axle). In any case:

The transmission itself is the same for all years (except perhaps 1960).

The differential on the other hand is 1964 only. It is the only year that had provision for the rear transverse leaf spring on your car.
Corvair guy since 1982. I have personally restored at least 20 Vairs, many of them restored ground up.
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curvesman
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by curvesman » Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:57 pm

Not sure what the difference is between differential and transmission? The problem I had was towing the car on a u haul tow dolly got a flat tire with out knowing it and after a long time noticed it and the axle pulled out of tranny? mechanic said the bearing wore out the tranny?? or were ever the axle came in (I guess) so do you think I need a tranny or differential.
Thanks
Curvesman

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terribleted
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by terribleted » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:22 pm

The rear axles do not attach to the transmission they attach the differential. So the axle came out the side of the car? The inner ends of your axles slip fit into the sides of the differential. The axle pulling out of the differential may or may not have damaged the differential. All I can say without seeing the damage is that it is unlikely that you need a transmission from this type of failure. So maybe a differential.

How far did you tow it and how fast? In am assuming that if you had a rear axle failure the you had the front of the car on the dolly. You are not supposed to flat tow a Corvair automatic car. The rear wheels drive the internals of the transmission and can cause severe overheating of the unit and internal damage. Smell the transmission fluid if it smells acrid and burnt change it and hope for the best...
Corvair guy since 1982. I have personally restored at least 20 Vairs, many of them restored ground up.
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curvesman
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by curvesman » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:36 pm

I towed the cat 1100 miles like that 55. 60 miles per hour , u haul would not rent me a full trailer for this car. I messed up and have to pay the piper now!!

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terribleted
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by terribleted » Sat Aug 26, 2017 2:25 pm

Your best bet might be to find a complete 64 automatic transaxle (unit including transmission and differential). If you can find an operational used assembly the cost would likely be a lot less than trying to rebuild or repair what you have, particularly if you toasted the automatic trans (I think internal damage is likely if you flat towed it that far unless of course the engine was running the whole time which would provide cooling). This of course assumes that the differential is actually damaged and that the transmission is actually toasted.
Last edited by terribleted on Sat Aug 26, 2017 2:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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64powerglide
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by 64powerglide » Sat Aug 26, 2017 2:40 pm

Sounds more like a wheel bearing & some idiot told you something wrong. How about posting a photo of the problem.
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terribleted
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by terribleted » Sat Aug 26, 2017 2:44 pm

64powerglide wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 2:40 pm
Sounds more like a wheel bearing & some idiot told you something wrong. How about posting a photo of the problem.
Photos would help. I am also assuming a wheel bearing failure. The rest is simply wild ass guesses. Could be nothing more is needed than a fresh axle and an axle seal.
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bbodie52
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by bbodie52 » Sun Aug 27, 2017 4:21 am

Hopefully the illustrations below will help you to visualize the components in the back of your Corvair that connect engine power to the rear wheels. With an automatic transmission arrangement, power from the engine is linked to the transmission via a fluid coupling called a torque converter. From the torque converter that power is transferred via a long shaft to the transmission that provides shifting (first gear, second gear, neutral, reverse). The power is then sent back to the differential in the middle, where it takes a 90° turn and is distributed via the two axles to the rear wheels. The whole assembly of the transmission and differential is called a transaxle. The transaxle is unique to the rear engine vehicle in that it is a combined package. With a front engine, rear wheel drive car, the transmission is mounted directly on the engine and is connected via a driveshaft to the differential at the rear of the car, which in turn transfers the power to the rear wheels.

1964 DIFFERENTIAL
Image

DIFFERENTIAL AND AXLE ASSEMBLIES - EXPLODED VIEW
Image

POWERGLIDE 2-SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
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DIFFERENTIAL AXLE YOKE WITH UNIVERSAL JOINT
ImageImage

COMPLETE TRANSAXLE WITH POWERGLIDE TRANSMISSION AND DIFFERENTIAL
ImageImage

1964 Corvair Transverse Leaf Spring (Suspension component attaches to the differential in the center)
Image

The axle bearings are physically located behind the wheel hub on each wheel, and supports the weight of the vehicle on each axle. If an axle bearing failed during the time you were towing the vehicle, it may have separated and allowed the axle and attached wheel to pull free from the differential. As shown in the above picture, the axle yoke is simply a splined shaft that inserts in each side of the differential. The universal joints that are a part of each axle yoke allow for flexibility as the wheels move up and down while the vehicle is driven. In 1960-1964 Corvairs the axle yolks are not bolted to the differential. They are simply held in place by the wheel bearings and the axles, and are free to pull out of the differential if the wheel bearing assembly is detached from the suspension, or if it breaks and fails, which would allow the wheel and axle to pull out of the differential. Under these circumstances damage to the differential and transmission would be unlikely. However, oil circulation within the Powerglide transmission is only accomplished with the engine running, which in turn drives the pumps within the transmission to circulate oil. Towing the vehicle on the ground would cause the rear wheels to turn the differential, which would in-turn turn some components within the Powerglide transmission. Under these circumstances there would be little or no oil circulation within the Powerglide transmission to lubricate the spinning components. That is why towing the car on the ground can damage the Powerglide transmission. On a normal front engine, rear wheel drive car with an automatic transmission, it would be recommended that the driveshaft be removed that connects the differential to the transmission while towing the vehicle. This would prevent the rear wheels and differential from turning the transmission components without oil circulation being provided because of the idle engine. Separating power transmission between the rear wheels and the integrated Powerglide transmission on the transaxle is not possible. That is why it is not recommended that automatic transmission-based Corvair be towed with the rear wheels on the ground.

Firms like U-Haul don't like to rent car hauling trailers for use with Corvairs because of the rear weight bias of a rear engine car. Towed trailers can become unstable if there is more weight to the rear of the trailer than there is on the front of the trailer. Such a configuration can cause the trailer to begin to fishtail, which can result in an accident as the towed vehicle becomes uncontrollable. The only way to safely tow a rear engine Corvair would be to back the car onto the trailer so that the engine weight is towards the front of the trailer. The other way is to have such a long trailer that the small Corvair would sit on the forward part of the long trailer, with the engine area approximately above the trailer axle. Such a weight bias can help to stabilize the towed trailer. U-Haul has apparently taken the low risk approach by denying rentals to Corvair owners.

I have attached Corvair shop manual sections from the 1961 basic manual and the 1964 supplements. They can provide you with additional technical information and descriptions of these components.
Attachments
1964 Supplement - Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 3 - Suspension.pdf
1964 Supplement - Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 3 - Suspension
(564.64 KiB) Downloaded 9 times
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 3 - Suspension.pdf
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 3 - Suspension
(1.67 MiB) Downloaded 5 times
1964 Supplement - Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6c - Rear Axle.pdf
1964 Supplement - Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6c - Rear Axle
(661.15 KiB) Downloaded 11 times
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6c - Rear Axle.pdf
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6c - Rear Axle
(1.17 MiB) Downloaded 6 times
1964 Supplement - Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6e - Automatic Transmission.pdf
1964 Supplement - Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6e - Automatic Transmission
(538.95 KiB) Downloaded 5 times
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6e - Automatic Transmission.pdf
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6e - Automatic Transmission
(2.11 MiB) Downloaded 5 times
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6 - Power Train.pdf
1961 Chevrolet Corvair Shop Manual - Section 6 - Power Train
(704.51 KiB) Downloaded 6 times
Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
Image 1966 Corvair Corsa Convertible

joelsplace
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Re: HELP!! transmission problem

Unread post by joelsplace » Sat Sep 09, 2017 9:22 pm

99% correct except the Powerglide had a front and rear pump so it does pump fluid when rolling even when the engine isn't running. You are correct in that no cooling is available when the engine isn't running. Some people have flat towed Corvairs many miles with no issues and others claim overheating. Best to not do it or keep a close eye on it.

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