Timing question

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bbodie52
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Re: Timing question

Unread post by bbodie52 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 9:37 am

Were the throttle butterfly valves ever removed from the secondary carburetors? It is usually not a good idea to remove the butterfly valves at all during the carburetor rebuild, since the staked threads on the attachment screws have to be ground off to remove the butterfly valves, and then new replacement screws have to be obtained to reinstall them properly.

I would doubt that the throttle shafts in the secondary carburetors would see enough activity to wear them down excessively or to create any type of vacuum leak between the shaft and the carburetor body. The primary carburetors might see enough activity over the decades to create wear around the throttle shafts and carburetor body area, but the secondary carburetors do not see nearly as much activity around the throttle shafts when compared to the amount of throttle activity that would be seen in the primary carburetors. As previously stated, properly installed throttle butterfly valves in the secondary carburetors should seal almost completely when the throttles are fully closed.

The only source of a positive throttle closure the secondary carburetors in the spring tension that is applied by the internal accelerator pumps. There is not a great deal of spring tension available from that source, so it is possible that the secondary carburetor throttle butterfly may not be fully closed. Dirt and other deposits may form around the throttle butterflies in the secondaries after long periods of inactivity. This might cause the throttle butterfly in the secondary carburetor to remain partially open, which is effectively a vacuum leak. (Low speed and idle circuits do not exist in the secondary carburetors).

Getting back to the primary carburetors, if turning the idle speed adjustment screw does not affect engine idle, it is possible that throttle linkage itself is binding or not properly adjusted and is preventing the primary throttle butterfly valves for moving when the idle speed adjustment screw setting is changed. It is important that the throttle cross-linkage be disconnected when setting the initial idle and synchronizing both carburetors. This prevents the rest of the linkage from restricting movement or having any impact on obtaining the desired idle speed and carburetor synchronization. The remaining linkage is only reconnected once the two primary carburetors are properly adjusted and synchronized. When the remaining linkage is reconnected and should be carefully checked to ensure that it is not binding at any point and that the connections are adjusted using the swivel linkage on the left primary carburetor to ensure that the cross linkage does not restrict the carburetors from opening and closing smoothly and without restriction from the rest of the linkage.

Since you had the engine idling at a low 500 RPM I am not sure that any type of vacuum leak existed. A vacuum leak would probably prevent the engine from idling at such a slow speed. But if the carburetor throttles were being restricted from movement in some way by the cross linkage, changing the idle speed screws setting might not impact the position of the throttle butterfly. Again, the cross linkage should be disconnected from the carburetors temporarily let you go through the process of synchronizing and adjusting the idle speed.
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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:01 am

bbodie52 wrote:
I have all the manuals and have read them over and over and than I have books from authors and than I read the forums. Unfortunately some book information does contrast with the manual.

About bending the tang : In bob helts book he states to bend the tang see photo of text Image
Image
So it can be a little confusing.

Also I thought I read that I am to set idle and timing before balancing the carbs with the unisync. I have them screwed out I think 1 1/2 turns to start.
:doh: :dontknow: :think: You are right — it can be confusing if you do not understand the objective of the procedure that is being discussed. In the case of this book illustration, the procedure for bending the tang has nothing to do with setting the base idle speed. The procedure discussed would be used for modifying or adjusting the FAST IDLE SPEED that is associated with the choke mechanism. The procedure you described in the section of Bob Helt's book is applicable to adjusting the choke mechanism, which only impacts the engine idle when the engine is cold. Once the engine warms to normal operating temperatures the choke mechanism would be fully disengaged and will have no impact on normal engine operation.

Tuning the engine, including setting the base ignition system dwell and timing, idle speed, and synchronizing the carburetors are all intended to be done with the engine at normal operating temperatures and the choke mechanism disengaged. If you are trying to adjust the idle speed before the engine has fully warmed up, and when the carburetor throttle linkage has still engaged the choke mechanism fast idle cam you would be unsuccessful.

There is definitely an interaction between the various subsystems in the ignition system and fuel system. It is important to follow the tuning procedures and do them sequentially in the right order to obtain a good outcome. For example, if your distributor uses ignition points, changing the point gap (dwell) does affect the ignition timing. You would not wish to adjust the ignition timing first before you adjust the point gap. By the same token, changing the ignition timing can affect the idle speed. You would not expect to be able to attain a final idle speed if you had to adjust the ignition timing afterward. However, it is important to understand the impact of the vacuum advance and centrifugal advance on idle speed and timing. If your idle speed is so fast (greater than 800 RPM) that the centrifugal advance comes into play, the engine is idling too fast to accurately set the base ignition timing. Likewise, if the vacuum advance hose is connected and the idle speed screw on the right carburetor has been adjusted to a point where the throttle butterfly valve is opened too far, enough intake manifold vacuum may reach the spark port on the carburetor to cause the vacuum advance to advance the timing. Again, the idle setting on the right carburetor and the connection of the vacuum advance hose would make it impossible to set the timing accurately with the timing light. Some of the basic settings for the carburetors are done with the engine not running. The procedure that is described using a strip of paper to feel the point at which the idle speed screw just comes into contact with the carburetor throttle linkage is done with the engine not running and with the choke mechanism temporarily disconnected to ensure that the fast idle cam is not engaged. This initial idle speed and idle mixture screw setting on each carburetor provides an identical mechanical adjustment to be used as a starting point for tuning the engine. It is accomplished with both the choke mechanism and the cross linkage between the two carburetors disconnected. Once these basic carburetor settings have been established, the ignition points would also be set with a feeler gauge. The engine would be started and warm to full operating temperature. The ignition point dwell would be checked with a dwell tachometer. If the points needed to be adjusted because the dwell reading was out of spec, this would be accomplished before proceeding with adjusting the timing. With the points properly adjusted the engine is restarted, and with the vacuum advance disconnected and plugged the idle speed would be confirmed to be low enough to prevent the centrifugal advance from being engaged. If the idle speed was greater than 800 RPM the idle speed screws would be backed off equally on both carburetors to lower the RPM below 800 RPM. Then the timing light would be used to check the base ignition timing. Once the timing and dwell had been improperly adjusted it is possible to proceed with establishing a proper idle speed — making any adjustments equally on both sides to keep both primary carburetors and mechanical sync. If you are using a UniSyn gauge, the tachometer and UniSyn gauge would be used simultaneously as a final step to ensure that airflow through each primary carburetor is matched and in sync and that the final idle speed is attained by fine-tuning the idle speed and idle mixture screws in conjunction with the tachometer readings and the UniSyn gauge readings. It is often necessary to go back and forth with the carburetor adjustments while watching the instruments to obtain a final goal of having the engine at the proper idle speed and also having the carburetors synchronized. Once the carburetors have been synchronized the cross linkage is reconnected — using the linkage on the left carburetor (which includes a screw adjustment) to reattach the cross linkage to both carburetors without impacting the idle speed. Once this is been done the portion of the linkage that connects to the throttle pedal is adjusted so that it engages with the linkage without impacting the idle speed.

All of the steps require an understanding of the goals involved and an understanding of the potential for impact between one setting and another.

The book that I attached earlier, DELCO ROCHESTER - Models H, HV Carburetor Service Manual contains a lot of information describing the functional operation of each carburetor subsystem. The 1960s vintage ignition and carburetor systems accomplish many of the engine control functions that present day electronic computer programmed systems perform with electronic sensors and preprogrammed engine operating parameters. But they do it without the benefit of electronic sensors and electronic control circuits. Instead, they use mechanical weights and springs and vacuum diaphragms and integrated vacuum ports and other mechanical mechanisms within the carburetor to accomplish what we use electronic fuel injection and electronic ignition control to perform now. Though the 1960s carburetors and ignition systems were not as sophisticated as modern electronic systems are, they did manage to do a fairly good job of controlling engine operation through a wide variety of engine speeds, performance and throttle settings, and operating environment changes. The Corvair mechanic must make many adjustments that impact engine operation. These adjustments would not be necessary on a modern engine since electronic sensors and preprogrammed electronic computer control keeps the engine operating as design engineers intended. Bob Helt's book and the Delco Rochester service manual contain enough theory information to help the mechanic to understand the purpose of the various settings and adjustments that must be made in the fuel system to attain proper engine operation. As described in the tuneup videos, it is essential to have an understanding of the sequence and need for each adjustment to accomplish the final goal of an engine that runs properly and reliably. Performing these adjustments out of order or improperly adjusting one setting to compensate for a faulty adjustment somewhere else often ends with frustration and confusion when the engine fails to perform as desired.
Ok I think I was a little confused about fast idle and idle speed thinking they were only one system but they are actually two systems. And the fast idle plays no role once the vehicle is warmed

I think that I may have started my adjustments when car was not at full warm up. I did notice that once it is fully warmed idle is going too low to the point of cooking out.
I think I need to buy a secondary tachometer to get an accurate read. mine is working but not accurate (thus not working)

I for sure am not going above 800rpm and I understand that if I did it will nullify all readings and adjustments


Thanks again. I will master this as i have several of the other systems that I have been asking questions about. I have such a better understanding of my car than I did 6months ago. I came in not knowing much at all regarding engine mechanics but I am very handy and a good investigator. Boy am I glad we have these forums.


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:01 am

I am ant to add that I electronic ignition the FAST system and I love Image️ it. So no dwell and no points.


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:02 am

Sorry for poor spelling.

I have electronic ignition.


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:27 am

tom becker wrote:If your engine is not a turbo, I would check the advance weights in the distributor. I was having problems trying to find out why the engine ran poorly. After several months I tore the distributor apart only to find the advance weights were put in backwards. This caused the timing to retard as the engine revved up not advance. After fixing the problem and car ran great. Not sure if any of this has anything to do with your problem. TOM
No turbo.
Thanks for this advice


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:38 am

terribleted wrote:Concerning the secondary carbs, the key is that the throttle plates must be fully closed. If the plates seal well in the bores of the carbs and are closed all the way they should not present an issue. If you have had the throttle plates out of the carbs make sure they are installed correctly as in evenly touching the carb throats and not upside down. (the plates are beveled so they present a larger contact area on the carb bore. The bevel on the upper side of the plate should be down and should be up on the part of the plate below the throttle shaft. If they are upside down they will be more prone to air leak. ) I would set an initial setting of 2 turns out on the mixture screws on both primaries. Do not touch these again until you have idle and timing set properly. You can then go back and turn the mixture screws in slightly. As soon as the idle changes while you are doing this back out 1/4 turn, set both the same and then do not touch them again:) These generally end up between 1.5 and 2 turns out. Both carbs should have similar idle screw settings once timing and curb idle are in range. If not (one carb speed screw turned way in and the other not for example) there is something wrong in the carbs generally the one that is turned in much farther. Balancing the carbs is to get the airflow at idle the same on each side. The difference in physical idle screw settings between the sides should be small. Balancing should be done after the car is idling warm at the desired setting and timing is correct.
Ok. Thanks for this I will follow your instructions. Carbs are 1 1/2 right now but a while ago they were out very far and spark plugs were old and black -way to rich of a mixture

I realize this idle issue has been a problem since I've gotten the vehicle. I use to have to keep my foot on the gas and balance clutch and gas at idle when it's warmed up. Otherwise I would stall. So this is a long term issue that I am only just recognizing as a problem.
I will double check the carbs and make sure they are air tight. I thought I got them but I will double check I never pulled throttle or choke bar off.
I'm looking into the bushing kit for the secondaries as one was leaking and very hard to diagnose but seems to be from the throttle bar (as brad pointed out this is odd since secondaries don't see much use) I do see light brass color thru the coating but not excessive.

I really like the advice you give based on your experience and my specific vehicle. several times now you've mentioned "my experience is the140 runs best this way" and that has been really helpful. The manual is a bit broad and seems to be a base point on some systems and than you must tune for your liking. Hearing what has worked for you is super helpful

I will set mixture screw and not touch as soon as I get the idle set up and timing


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by bbodie52 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 7:18 pm

Classic cars had a different way of doing things in the 1950s, 1960s and earlier, when compared to modern techniques utilizing sensors and computer technology to control fuel injection and ignition systems. There was a series of books that were published in the 1960s and 1970s that focus on basic principles of automobile design and function. These books covered basics associated with carburetors, ignition systems, suspension and brakes systems, etc. When I was a teenager I read through many of these books and they gave me a good understanding of the principles and functional designs that were common in the cars that I was interested in, including the Corvair. Once I read through these books, the shop manuals made a lot more sense to me as I began to understand how things function and what I was trying to accomplish in working on my Corvair. This series was published long ago (1960s-1970s) by Petersen Publishing Company, which was also associated with Hot Rod Magazine. With titles like Petersen's Basic Cams, Valves and Exhaust Systems, Petersen's Basic Ignition and Electrical Systems, and Petersen's Basic Carburetion and Fuel Systems, I was a teenager that found myself devouring much of the series to teach myself the basics that could be applied to most 1970s and earlier vehicles. The material in those books are now somewhat dated because of the change to computer-controlled electronic fuel injection and other sophisticated technologies that have been introduced in the subsequent decades. But I do feel a Corvair owner or any classic car owner could benefit from the material in these books. Many of them are listed as available on Amazon.com. If you would like to consider the possibility of reading through some of this material, the following link may help you to find what you're looking for. The cost of these books is low, and the investment in time that you might make in reading them may help you to develop a foundation of knowledge that will help you to leap ahead in your DIY maintenance efforts on your Corvair.

:link: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss ... pany+basic

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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 4:43 pm

bbodie52 wrote:Classic cars had a different way of doing things in the 1950s, 1960s and earlier, when compared to modern techniques utilizing sensors and computer technology to control fuel injection and ignition systems. There was a series of books that were published in the 1960s and 1970s that focus on basic principles of automobile design and function. These books covered basics associated with carburetors, ignition systems, suspension and brakes systems, etc. When I was a teenager I read through many of these books and they gave me a good understanding of the principles and functional designs that were common in the cars that I was interested in, including the Corvair. Once I read through these books, the shop manuals made a lot more sense to me as I began to understand how things function and what I was trying to accomplish in working on my Corvair. This series was published long ago (1960s-1970s) by Petersen Publishing Company, which was also associated with Hot Rod Magazine. With titles like Petersen's Basic Cams, Valves and Exhaust Systems, Petersen's Basic Ignition and Electrical Systems, and Petersen's Basic Carburetion and Fuel Systems, I was a teenager that found myself devouring much of the series to teach myself the basics that could be applied to most 1970s and earlier vehicles. The material in those books are now somewhat dated because of the change to computer-controlled electronic fuel injection and other sophisticated technologies that have been introduced in the subsequent decades. But I do feel a Corvair owner or any classic car owner could benefit from the material in these books. Many of them are listed as available on Amazon.com. If you would like to consider the possibility of reading through some of this material, the following link may help you to find what you're looking for. The cost of these books is low, and the investment in time that you might make in reading them may help you to develop a foundation of knowledge that will help you to leap ahead in your DIY maintenance efforts on your Corvair.

:link: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss ... pany+basic

ImageImageImageImageImage
Igor a set of 5 Peterson books and am devouring them when I can. Super helpful in understanding stock set up and basic fundamentals!!! Great advice from you and you inspired me to search and buy! Thanks again



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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 4:59 pm

UPDATE

I took a weekend break and came back and took everyone advice in mind. I checked my carbs and wrapped the tops to seal the secondaries which I have disconnected at the moment. Taking teds advice and make sure they are not leaking air.
Also re read all the advice here and the manual again but than read the idle speed set up section in "corvair for the not so mechanically inclined " Image
I used this as a guideline and visually looked at how the linkages operate and finally it clicked in my brain!! When I think back to my adjustments before when I was turning the screw but it would not affect idle--I was turning the screw OUT which I realize is not going to affect idle --you have to turn the screw IN to adjust idle speed. (At least when adjusting from this book). Doi!!!!
It was helpful to use the feeler gauge and than adjust 1 1/2 turns out to start. After I was warmed up I wound up turning in about 3 rotations to get my idle to 600. I than checked timing and it was fast at 24 so I adjusted down to 18-20 and runs real good. Idle is great. Does not stall.
I took her for a spin around the block and neighbors yelling NICE CAR but am leaking oil (slow seapage) out of the valve covers and my rocker is ticking so I am going to open up again. I bought a stethoscope and will try to do hot adjustment with the cut off valve covers and than torque the valve covers and hope that will fix my leaks.

So I am almost done!!!

I'm ordering Roger Parents carb linkage for 65 and than just pick up the bushings for my carb throttle bar leaks and than I should be done. That is until I move towards the front of the car.

Next project will be fixing transaxle as I hear the bearings. I think. sort of a high pitch whirring (which I originally paid corvair jmechanic in SF to fix but he clearly didn't) I may never stop complaining about that guy!!

Thanks everyone!! Again!!!


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by terribleted » Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:17 pm

Cheers:) Torqueing the valve cover bolts is not really necessary. Install either the cork and rubber gaskets or the silicone ones Clark's sells and tighten the bolts until the 4" long metal spring retainers bottom against the valve cover under the bolt and snug up only not TIGHT. I use a 1/4" drive ratchet for this you do not need more force. The valve cover spring retainers are located to the valve covers with the ends pointing up away from the cover not the other way around. Make sure the gasket surfaces on the head and valve cover are spotless. Look for any nicks or gouges that might leak and if seen perhaps a touch of silicone sealant on these spots only might work. I have not had good luck with applying silicone to the entire gasket. (is a pain to clean off later as well)

I recently installed a Parent 140 linkage set......very nice stuff!!!
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Re: Timing question

Unread post by bbodie52 » Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:34 pm

66corsaguy wrote:Next project will be fixing transaxle as I hear the bearings. I think. sort of a high pitch whirring (which I originally paid corvair jmechanic in SF to fix but he clearly didn't) I may never stop complaining about that guy!!
If you remove the fan belt and run the engine briefly, is the "high pitched whirring" sound still present?

If so is the whirring sound present when the car is parked with the engine running? Possibly dry or worn clutch throw out bearing improperly adjusted so that it is continually in contact with the clutch pressure plate diaphragm spring — always spinning even when the clutch pedal is fully released?

If present when parked, transmission in NEUTRAL, and engine running, does the whirring sound stop when you depress the clutch? Transmission bearing?

I don't think the high-pitched whirring sound would come from the differential or axle bearings. That would usually be a squeaking or grinding sound, and might change when performing a turn.


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Manual Transmission Troubles and Remedies.jpg
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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:51 am

terribleted wrote:Cheers:) Torqueing the valve cover bolts is not really necessary. Install either the cork and rubber gaskets or the silicone ones Clark's sells and tighten the bolts until the 4" long metal spring retainers bottom against the valve cover under the bolt and snug up only not TIGHT. I use a 1/4" drive ratchet for this you do not need more force. The valve cover spring retainers are located to the valve covers with the ends pointing up away from the cover not the other way around. Make sure the gasket surfaces on the head and valve cover are spotless. Look for any nicks or gouges that might leak and if seen perhaps a touch of silicone sealant on these spots only might work. I have not had good luck with applying silicone to the entire gasket. (is a pain to clean off later as well)

I recently installed a Parent 140 linkage set......very nice stuff!!!
I have brand new clarks cork gaskets. I tried to not make them very tight cos I read over tight is bad but wondering if I made too loose but I don't think so (maybe too tight) I tightened just to the point that the cork squeezes a little.
Basically it is weaping and than that accumulates and winds up becoming a drip.

When I redo the rockers with stethoscope I will take your advice and figure out.

Thanks.


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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:01 pm

bbodie52 wrote:
66corsaguy wrote:Next project will be fixing transaxle as I hear the bearings. I think. sort of a high pitch whirring (which I originally paid corvair jmechanic in SF to fix but he clearly didn't) I may never stop complaining about that guy!!
If you remove the fan belt and run the engine briefly, is the "high pitched whirring" sound still present?

If so is the whirring sound present when the car is parked with the engine running? Possibly dry or worn clutch throw out bearing improperly adjusted so that it is continually in contact with the clutch pressure plate diaphragm spring — always spinning even when the clutch pedal is fully released?

If present when parked, transmission in NEUTRAL, and engine running, does the whirring sound stop when you depress the clutch? Transmission bearing?

I don't think the high-pitched whirring sound would come from the differential or axle bearings. That would usually be a squeaking or grinding sound, and might change when performing a turn.


Left-click the image (2 X for Maximum enlargement) for easier viewing...
Manual Transmission Troubles and Remedies.jpg
The noise is only when I am driving and most people with untrained ears would never notice. It's not very loud but it's an additional noise along with regular road and engine noise. It's so hard to explain. But only when moving

When I went for a test ride with mechanic he pointed it out and said it was differential and something he would fix. But When I got the car back the noise was still there. Image
Reading up on the dif I figured possibly bearings. It sounds like its speed related and constant. sounds almost like two objects so close but not touching. It's not a squeal or squeak or anything belt related.





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Re: Timing question

Unread post by terribleted » Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:37 pm

66corsaguy wrote:
Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:51 am
terribleted wrote:Cheers:) Torqueing the valve cover bolts is not really necessary. Install either the cork and rubber gaskets or the silicone ones Clark's sells and tighten the bolts until the 4" long metal spring retainers bottom against the valve cover under the bolt and snug up only not TIGHT. I use a 1/4" drive ratchet for this you do not need more force. The valve cover spring retainers are located to the valve covers with the ends pointing up away from the cover not the other way around. Make sure the gasket surfaces on the head and valve cover are spotless. Look for any nicks or gouges that might leak and if seen perhaps a touch of silicone sealant on these spots only might work. I have not had good luck with applying silicone to the entire gasket. (is a pain to clean off later as well)

I recently installed a Parent 140 linkage set......very nice stuff!!!
I have brand new clarks cork gaskets. I tried to not make them very tight cos I read over tight is bad but wondering if I made too loose but I don't think so (maybe too tight) I tightened just to the point that the cork squeezes a little.
Basically it is weaping and than that accumulates and winds up becoming a drip.

When I redo the rockers with stethoscope I will take your advice and figure out.

Thanks.


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You do have the 5" long 1/4" thick steel retainers under each of your valve cover bolts don't you?
Corvair guy since 1982. I have personally restored at least 20 Vairs, many of them restored ground up.
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Re: Timing question

Unread post by bbodie52 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:17 pm

:goodpost:

ImageImage

The picture below shows a couple of assembly tips that are helpful on the Corvair engine. The steel retainers mentioned earlier help to spread the pressure applied to the valve cover and gasket along three points, instead of only the bolt head. The outer ends of each strap are curved. Installed as shown, the curved tips act to apply distributed spring pressure on the valve cover in conjunction with each center bolt.

The upper row of head bolts tend to rust and soften with engine heat and exposure to the elements. A new fresh set of flange nuts, properly torqued, and then capped with acorn nuts to protect the exposed threads of each stud will make future removal much easier. The use of a six-point socket instead of a 12-point socket provides a better grip on the nut, which helps to prevent the socket from slipping or rounding-off the corners of the head nut.
Engine Tips.jpg
Image

ImageImage

:link: http://www.corvair.com/user-cgi/catalog ... IN&page=13
Image
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Re: Timing question

Unread post by 66corsaguy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:26 pm

terribleted wrote:
66corsaguy wrote:
Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:51 am
terribleted wrote:Cheers:) Torqueing the valve cover bolts is not really necessary. Install either the cork and rubber gaskets or the silicone ones Clark's sells and tighten the bolts until the 4" long metal spring retainers bottom against the valve cover under the bolt and snug up only not TIGHT. I use a 1/4" drive ratchet for this you do not need more force. The valve cover spring retainers are located to the valve covers with the ends pointing up away from the cover not the other way around. Make sure the gasket surfaces on the head and valve cover are spotless. Look for any nicks or gouges that might leak and if seen perhaps a touch of silicone sealant on these spots only might work. I have not had good luck with applying silicone to the entire gasket. (is a pain to clean off later as well)

I recently installed a Parent 140 linkage set......very nice stuff!!!
I have brand new clarks cork gaskets. I tried to not make them very tight cos I read over tight is bad but wondering if I made too loose but I don't think so (maybe too tight) I tightened just to the point that the cork squeezes a little.
Basically it is weaping and than that accumulates and winds up becoming a drip.

When I redo the rockers with stethoscope I will take your advice and figure out.

Thanks.


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You do have the 5" long 1/4" thick steel retainers under each of your valve cover bolts don't you?
Yes absolutely


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