1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Fri May 19, 2017 8:24 pm

Exhaust system reinstalled, back on the floor, and fired up fuel pump looking for leaks, and I found one after I started it up. The driver's side secondary was dumping fuel down the throat of the carb. Found the ball bearing "needle and seat" had a sticky spot in it like I've never seen before. Luckily I had another one. It's back together and I have halfway balanced the carbs on Roger's linkage kit.
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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Mon May 22, 2017 2:28 pm

Got the carbs balanced, and took it for a drive to warm it up fully. Still a tiny bit of a sticky spot in the accelerator linkage, I attribute it to not locking down one of the locknuts on the driver's side primary, taking all the wiggle out of the Heim joint and preventing the passenger side primary from closing fully. I readjusted to get the bit of wiggle back and properly locked it down, should be good to go now. Threw a bit of resin glaze cleaner/polisher on the roof and trunk. Still needs a paint job. :/
Was going to drive it to work today but will wait till the temps back in the 70s to keep the driver cool.
Still have to R&R the dash again to replace the quartz rebuilt clock again, the first one runs slow and the adjustment gear seems to be a bit stripped so can't adjust the clock correctly. Clark's sent me another one.

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GasDaddy140
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by GasDaddy140 » Sat May 27, 2017 5:35 pm

You have a very sugary Corvair! It is sweet!
Alan Duquette
Rohnert Park, CA
"When in doubt...Hit the gas!" A.J. Foyt.

1965 Corvair Corsa (field find) I will build my ship that comes in.
1971 Dodge Sportsman "shorty" 318 van
2015 Nissan Juke S

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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Tue May 30, 2017 1:07 pm

Balanced the carbs a bit more and replaced the bad quartz clock with another that keeps good time and I can adjust it.. No oil on the floor under the car so far, fingers crossed. Car show this Saturday.

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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Tue Jun 06, 2017 1:22 pm

Successfully made it to car show and back, still no oil on the floor. :) 5 nice Corvairs in Function 4 Junction this year, I couldn't just say I have the nicest Corvair at this car show, glossing over the fact that often I am the only Corvair at that car show.

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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Wed Jun 28, 2017 1:48 pm

Found that I had the + side coil condenser on the - side of the coil, a bit embarrassed about that; will have to see how it runs and if it affected the timing.

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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:38 am

I replaced the 50 year old stock style coil (I had a bad aftermarket Bosch and swapped it with another old coil a few months back) with a Flamethrower 1 coil with stock internal resistance. Cleaned up and moved the noise suppression condenser to the + side of the coil like it should be. I also had noticed a bit of an inconsistent idle speed with my new Roger Parent linkage system, so thought I'd look into that a bit too, since I'll be driving it in a 4th of July parade next week. IF you put it together correctly, it works great! However, I had inadvertently installed the passenger side linkage to the wrong side of the bellcrank. It worked, but it had less side to side free play then the driver's side link did. So, I moved it to the other side, effectively lengthening it. I loosened the bellcrank and adjusted it up to compensate for the effective longer length. Now the side to side play is much better.
I drove it to work this morning and after the chokes opened up, instead of the 900-1000RPM I wanted, it dropped consistently to 500-550 which is a bit too low and so I feathered it at stop lights till I got to work, and I added 1/4 turn to both idle screws. I'll take it to have a slow leaker tire looked at and see if I need to tweak the idle up more or down a bit till I'm happy. Seems to be running MUCH better with the cap on the right side of the coil and the new coil, not sure if it was one, the other or both that made it better, don't really care, cause it's better.

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Gregory_Miller
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by Gregory_Miller » Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:05 am

Still been struggling with the "same old same old" part throttle driveability problem. I got to looking at the rotor and cap, and even though the rotor lines up perfectly with the #1 spark plug wire tower when the timing mark is set to 0, there seems to be an issue with where the rotor is in relationship to the tower when the spark actually fires.
Follow this and tell me if I have it right:
Rotor turns clockwise, and if the plug was to fire right at top dead center, the rotor should be centered in it's travel past the relevant electrode in the cap. Advancing the timing would make the plug fire sooner, and the rotor would be somewhere counter-clockwise in it's travel TO the relevant plug tower, looking at it from the top. Say 18 degrees, for example. this would make the left side of the rotor and the right side of the electrode in the distributor cap be the closest together for the spark to jump, correct?

Well, what I am seeing is the right side of the rotor and the left side of the electrode in the cap have the marks from the spark jumping the gap, like the rotor is already past the electrode in the cap when the coil fires.
Thoughts?

This is a converted 110 distributor with the correct weights and as far as I know the correct springs, but can't tell just by looking at them.

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bbodie52
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Re: 1965 Corsa clone, but a sweeeeeet one

Unread post by bbodie52 » Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:33 pm

I think this illustration shows what you imagine is possibly happening inside your distributor. But in a mechanical distributor, the relationship between the rotor and cap are physically locked into alignment and are not adjustable.

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Let’s begin by looking at what happens underneath the distributor cap of a simple mechanical centrifugal and vacuum advance ignition system. With most typical mechanical advance distributors, the weights and springs are located on a plate that also mounts the rotor.
Centrifugal Advance Weights.jpg
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As rpm increases, centrifugal force pulls the weights against spring tension and moves the plate, which advances the rotor in relation to the spark plug wire terminals in the distributor cap. The plate that mounts the rotor is connected to the distributor shaft that also spins the distributor cam, with 6 lobes (for a 6 cylinder engine). When each cam lobe passes by the ignition points rubbing block, it opens the circuit that charges the ignition coil, which collapses the magnetic field in the coil and causes a high voltage discharge to initiate a spark from the coil through the rotor, across the gap to the distributor cap post and on its way to the spark plug. In a standard ignition points application, the distributor cam lobe opens the ignition points at exactly the same time that the tip of the rotor lines up with the intended terminal inside the distributor cap. These two (cap and rotor) are in a fixed relationship with each other. Mechanical advance moves not only the position of the distributor cam in relation to the ignition points, but also the rotor in relation to the distributor cap spark plug wire terminal.

Stock distributors align the rotor with the spark plug terminal on the distributor cap with the engine at the initial timing position, and since the distributor cam and rotor are fixed together, mechanical advance does not cause phasing issues because as the points trigger (cam) is advanced, so is the rotor.

Vacuum advance works in a similar fashion. When engine vacuum is applied to the canister, it pulls on the plate that mounts the ignition points. By moving the plate in the opposite direction of the rotating shaft, this also advances the timing.

The main problems caused by the rotor and cap are corrosion or carbon buildup that can cause misfiring, or cracks and carbon tracks in the cap that can also cause misfiring by misrouting a high voltage discharge to a place other than the desired spark plug.

Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
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