Memoirs of a Monza

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martyscarr
Posts: 254
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:33 am
Location: Eugene, OR

Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by martyscarr » Thu Jun 08, 2017 9:11 am

The "little wedges" are called "valve keepers" or "valve locks". The "spring cap" is called the "valve spring retainer" or just "retainer". The keepers grip the valve with a collet type grip provided by the taper between the keeper and retainer, the groove is really just there to locate the keeper/retainer and is not designed to hold the assembly together on the valve.

The picture of the intake with the gap in the keepers is correct. The keepers touching on the exhaust is not correct. I would grind those exhaust keepers a bit so they don't butt up to one another; they will grip the valve correctly if their edges are not touching each other.

From Comp Cams website:
http://www.compcams.com/catalog/COMP201 ... 12_358.pdf

HTH
Marty Scarr

joefarmer
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:38 pm
Location: Tyler

Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by joefarmer » Fri Jun 09, 2017 6:31 am

Thanks Marty, that makes sense. I'll probably lay a piece of fine grit sandpaper out on the workbench and just give those valve keepers a few slides across before final assembly.

Regarding head stud torques..... I understand that they are anywhere from 10ftlb to 30ftlb. That seems like a wide range to me though. What is commonly done out there by all you guys who have done engine rebuilds? I want the system to be buttoned up tight, but I sure don't want to rip a head stud out and have to start from scratch! I'm not really worried about the studs which go to the rockers (they same strong and the threads look good). I'm really concerned about the upper studs that just have a flange nut on them. Several of these are old and have badly damaged threads. Am I the only one who has faced this dilemma?

Thanks in advance for your advice!
Joe Farmer
64 Corvair Monza 900
Follow along at:
https://www.corvairforum.com/forum/view ... 52&t=12693

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bbodie52
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Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by bbodie52 » Fri Jun 09, 2017 7:51 am

That upper row of cylinder head nuts have always been vulnerable to damage, due to their exposure to heat as well as dirt and corrosion. I discovered that when I did my first engine rebuild at age 16 in 1969. I had a heck of a time getting those nuts off — particularly the ones under the intake manifold. The metal becomes soft because of the heat, and if you're not careful it is easy to round them off. Cutting them with a chisel is not easy. In one case my father suggested an aircraft maintenance trick where I center-punched the stud and then drilled it out to the depth of the nut with a drill bit that was the approximate diameter of the stud. Once the stud was hollowed-out I was able to knock it off — along with the damaged nut — with a large chisel. With another damaged nut I ended up cutting the stud near the cylinder barrel using a hacksaw blade.

Wire brushing the exposed threads and cleaning them with something like WD-40, and then using a six point socket (not a 12 point socket) helps because the tool gets a better grip on the nut flats is not so prone to rounding off the corners. But in any case replacing those soft, damaged cylinder head nuts is a good idea. That is why Clark's Corvair Parts offers them and recommends that they only be used once. They even sell acorn nuts to install on top of the cylinder head nut to protect the threads from exposure to water and dirt (promoting easier removal later).

Image

:link: http://www.corvair.com/user-cgi/catalog ... IN&page=13
Image

The use of anti-seize compound on threads is often recommended. However anti-seize compound is a lubricant, and as noted below and in the attached document the anti-seize compound can cause over tightening of the fastener when using the "dry" torque specification. On the Corvair engine this would be of particular concern when torquing the cylinder head nuts, if too much tension is applied to the studs and possibly causes them to be pulled out of the soft aluminum threads in the engine cases. I would tend to shy away from using anti-seize compound on the cylinder head nuts. I would rather use brand-new fittings that are heat-treated and torque them properly with the threads dry and not lubricated. I would not want to risk over tightening the fitting and possibly pulling the stud out of the engine cases.
Antiseize compound is a lubricant. Accordingly, you need to reduce the torque on spark plugs and fasteners about 30%. This will help prevent stripping threads, particularly in aluminum block engines. Use antiseize sparingly. A "half a pea size" drop on spark plug threads is all that's needed. Allow thread rotation to spread the compound. High temperature nickel compound is the product of choice. It's harder and keeps dissimilar metals apart.

ASME torque convention is dry (without lubrication), unless specified otherwise. Pay attention to this when tightening head bolts and changing spark plugs.
Attachments
Anti-Seize Compound and Torque Specifications.pdf
Anti-Seize Compound and Torque Specifications
(86.2 KiB) Downloaded 8 times
Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
Image 1966 Corvair Corsa Convertible

joefarmer
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:38 pm
Location: Tyler

Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by joefarmer » Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:43 am

So.... it's been a while. Haven't been on the forum since earlier this summer, but I HAVE been busy. Here's what I've gotten done since my last post:

1. The engine rebuild was completed mid-July
2. Decided to saddle up and rebuild the PG as well (my first time ever going through a transmission)
3. Cleaned the differential but decided not to rebuild at this time
4. Reassembled the power train and bolted back into the car
5. Topped off fluids and noticed that gear oil was leaking from the driver side axle yolk, so I pulled the axles back out and replaced both of those little seals
6. Went ahead and greased bearings on the axle with a needle-type tip for my grease gun.
7. Axles went back in and the leak is better, but still dripping a little bit... any ideas why I would still have a leak?
8. New brakes all the way around (New master cylinder, new hoses, new cylinders, new shoes, new hardware, turned brake drums, started with completely empty brake lines and bled until no more air bubbles)
10. Yesterday rolled the car out on the driveway and with the help of my wife got the thing to crank!!! It ran for about 6 minutes and then died. It did run long enough to get the oil hot and long enough for me to play with the timing a little, but not long enough to adjust the valves; that will have to be next time.

So, if you've made it through all of this and you're still with me, I have the following questions:

1. The thing was a bugger to get cranked! The only way we got it going was to keep the key turned over while alternating starter fluid between each carb for like a straight 90 seconds (and I'm not a fan of using starter fluid anyway....) is it normal to have that hard of a time cranking up? After it died and I tried to crank again we had the same issue. What do I need to do so that it will "bust-off" without the use of starter fluid? I am getting gas to the carbs btw. And timing is set close enough to where it should catch pretty easy. I'd like for it to crank within 2 or 3 seconds of turning the key (like any normal car).

2. The only major leak I had after the oil got hot was at the valve covers (both of them). New gaskets from Clarks, bolts torqued with an in-lb torque wrench, but both valve covers leaked like they didn't even have a gasket on them! Any ideas?

3. What do I need to do before I drive this car down the road for the first time? I know to check timing with a light, check vacuum lines, adjust the valves (while running), and to re-check all fluids. Is there any other step I'm missing before I can test drive?
Joe Farmer
64 Corvair Monza 900
Follow along at:
https://www.corvairforum.com/forum/view ... 52&t=12693

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GasDaddy140
Posts: 214
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2014 1:57 pm

Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by GasDaddy140 » Mon Sep 04, 2017 9:07 pm

Hi Joe Farmer! How did you set your valves, zero lash?
I'm certain you'll find help here. It should fire right up, if it's close in settings. Keep us posted!
Alan Duquette
Rohnert Park, CA
"When in doubt...Hit the gas!" A.J. Foyt.

1965 Corvair Corsa (field find) Project
1971 Dodge Sportsman "shorty" 318 van
2015 Nissan Juke S

joefarmer
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:38 pm
Location: Tyler

Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by joefarmer » Fri Nov 10, 2017 8:09 am

Alright, gonna keep working on this project. Interest comes in waves, but I believe that is normal for most professional weekend tinkerers. The Monza cranks and runs, having some issues with reverse but I believe a manual valve adjustment is going to clear these up. The carbs need to be tuned and synced. Here are my current pain points: Any help is always appreciated, this forum is a great source of information.

Major Priority Stuff - To be fixed before state inspection

1. I get a massive amount of popping and stuttering when accelerating from a standstill, but once I'm cruising down the road it runs smooth as silk...
2. Fumes are pretty bad, but I've got no pcv installed and it just vents straight from the crankcase tube. PCV is ordered and will be hooked to the air cleaner and crossover tube. Hopefully this helps. I don't want to suffocate any passengers.
3. Fan/Gen light not going off now even after polarizing the generator at the regulator. I believe I'll need to rebuild generator. How do I check the current voltage being produced before a rebuild? And when rebuilding, what all will I need?

Minor Stuff:

4. Turn signal switch is loose and unreliable. Will need to pull the wheel and probably replace some parts to firm this up.
5. Had the radio completely rebuilt by a good friend who bench tested it and shows it works, but my speaker is busted and antennae is broken. Will need to replace both of these. Anybody used the stereo speaker from Clarks? Will it fit into the old 10ohm speaker location pretty easily?
6. Front seats are trashed. Can't really afford to have them redone professionally right now. Anyone recommend a certain type of seat cover that looks original?
7. Windshield wipers tend to stutter... Is this the motor being worn out or linkage needs adjusting?
8. What is the best way to clean out and perform maintenance on all the heater vents? I believe mine to be stuck and full of mouse nests and other debris...
9. Is there any way to quiet down the engine compartment? I know aluminum air cooled engines will be louder than their water-cooled counterparts, but if there is a way to insulate the engine bay a little better, that would be nice.....

Thanks for any recommendations!!! My goal is still to drive this thing in the town Christmas parade this year.
Joe Farmer
64 Corvair Monza 900
Follow along at:
https://www.corvairforum.com/forum/view ... 52&t=12693

PaulR
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2015 7:56 pm
Location: Appleton, WI

Re: Memoirs of a Monza

Unread post by PaulR » Mon Nov 13, 2017 8:47 pm

joefarmer wrote:
Fri Nov 10, 2017 8:09 am
Alright, gonna keep working on this project. Interest comes in waves, but I believe that is normal for most professional weekend tinkerers. The Monza cranks and runs, having some issues with reverse but I believe a manual valve adjustment is going to clear these up. The carbs need to be tuned and synced. Here are my current pain points: Any help is always appreciated, this forum is a great source of information.

Major Priority Stuff - To be fixed before state inspection

1. I get a massive amount of popping and stuttering when accelerating from a standstill, but once I'm cruising down the road it runs smooth as silk...
2. Fumes are pretty bad, but I've got no pcv installed and it just vents straight from the crankcase tube. PCV is ordered and will be hooked to the air cleaner and crossover tube. Hopefully this helps. I don't want to suffocate any passengers.
3. Fan/Gen light not going off now even after polarizing the generator at the regulator. I believe I'll need to rebuild generator. How do I check the current voltage being produced before a rebuild? And when rebuilding, what all will I need?

Minor Stuff:

4. Turn signal switch is loose and unreliable. Will need to pull the wheel and probably replace some parts to firm this up.
5. Had the radio completely rebuilt by a good friend who bench tested it and shows it works, but my speaker is busted and antennae is broken. Will need to replace both of these. Anybody used the stereo speaker from Clarks? Will it fit into the old 10ohm speaker location pretty easily?
6. Front seats are trashed. Can't really afford to have them redone professionally right now. Anyone recommend a certain type of seat cover that looks original?
7. Windshield wipers tend to stutter... Is this the motor being worn out or linkage needs adjusting?
8. What is the best way to clean out and perform maintenance on all the heater vents? I believe mine to be stuck and full of mouse nests and other debris...
9. Is there any way to quiet down the engine compartment? I know aluminum air cooled engines will be louder than their water-cooled counterparts, but if there is a way to insulate the engine bay a little better, that would be nice.....

Thanks for any recommendations!!! My goal is still to drive this thing in the town Christmas parade this year.
Try just replacing the brushes on the generator if you have not done so. Take the wiper motor apart and thoroughly clean the inside and polish the electrical contacts. There is a post on that in this forum. To quiet down the passenger compartment from engine sounds, use carpet pad, jute or foam behind the rear seat and under the rear window package tray. There are other products specifically made to deaden engine sound but these costs less money.
1964 Monza convertible 110/PG

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