New owner with question

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stableclips
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Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:45 pm

New owner with question

Post by stableclips »

Hi, I recently purchased a 1966 convertible with a 110 HP engine. I just moved to North Dakota and want to know how to prep this car for winter. Can anyone advise me please?

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bbodie52
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Re: New owner with question

Post by bbodie52 »

:welcome2: :wave: :wave: :clap: Welcome to the Corvair Forum!
stableclips wrote: » Thu Oct 08, 2020 6:51 pm

....I recently purchased a 1966 convertible with a 110 HP engine. I just moved to North Dakota and want to know how to prep this car for winter. Can anyone advise me....
Prep the car for winter... STORAGE or USE??

Park it inside an enclosed garage and never expose it to road salt! All Corvairs (1960-1969) are aging and vulnerable to body rot, rust, and corrosion. Fender areas rust, the base of the windshield is a common problem area, and the floors rust through. The Corvair body is of UNIBODY construction, meaning most of the body serves as the frame structure, and rusty components cannot be unbolted from the frame and replaced. Repairs are expensive and demand cutting and welding of the sheet metal. Late Model (LM — 1965-1969) were manufactured with body sheet metal that was somewhat thinner than the Early Model (1960-1964) Corvairs, so LM Corvairs are even more susceptible to damage that is accelerated by invading road salt in snow country. AND THE CONVERTIBLES ARE THE WORST! Without a roof structure, the area surrounding the doors had to be reinforced internally to give the body adequate strength. Dirt and salt can invade those areas of the unibody chassis and weaken them to the point of being dangerous as what is left of the body flexes. The body can be destroyed beyond the point where reconstruction can be accomplished at any reasonable cost.

So even though the rear engine Corvair can do fairly well in negotiating snow-covered roads, the cost to the aging body can destroy the car, making what is left nothing but a parts donor.

I own a 1966 Corsa convertible that has had minimal exposure to rust damage, and I just bought a 1966 Monza 4-door sedan that was "born" in Los Angeles (Van Nuys GM plant) and has lived its 54 years in the Southern California climate, with no sign of rust or body rot. If your 1966 convertible is in reasonably good condition, with minimal rust or body rot, you should do everything you can do to isolate it from winter driving and road salt conditions. Mechanical repairs and restoration is relatively "doable" for the DIY "shade tree mechanic" and that is part of the rewarding fun of owning such a classic car. But body repair and restoration is a difficult artform that is expensive, time-consuming, and hard to learn. If you expect to own and enjoy your Corvair for years to come, protect it from winter road salt damage. It can be a "daily driver" during the Spring, Summer and Fall, but should not see much daylight in the winter when you live in snow country.

The link below will provide you with a list of useful websites that are Corvair-related. Some of the links will lead you to an extensive technical library that will allow you to download shop manuals and other technical references in Adobe Reader format at no cost. There is also a link that will help you to locate nearby CORSA (Corvair Society of America) club chapters. You will also find a list of essential Corvair parts suppliers. Clark's Corvair Parts in Shelburne Falls, MA is the biggest and oldest Corvair supplier in the world. You will find a link that can provide you with a series of videos that amount to a tour of the Clark's Corvair Parts facilities. Parts suppliers such as this truly make our Corvair hobby possible.

Common and Useful Corvair Websites

Corvair Forum :link: http://www.corvairforum.com/forum/viewt ... 225&t=6007

:dontknow: I would like to encourage you to expand on your initial post and tell us more about yourself, your Corvair interests, and your goals for your Corvair. Helping us to know more about you will help us to write comments to you that are tailored to your needs and experience. Detailed pictures of your Corvair — including the engine compartment — would possibly be useful. Knowing your location may also suggest possibilities in supporting your Corvair interests.

:welcome: :welcome2:

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Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
Image 1966 Corvair Corsa Convertible

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terribleted
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Re: New owner with question

Post by terribleted »

I am assuming you are talking about storing it. Inside is best, change oil and filter and disconnect the fuel inlet line and run the car until it quits to empty the carbs of fuel so the fuel in them does not evaporate making gum and maybe crystals (ethanol fuel). Reconnect the fuel line. Disconnect the battery. Fuel in the tank should be treated with an appropriate quantity of fuel stabilizer if storage will be 6 months or less. For longer storage draining the tank is a good idea. Jack standing the car supported under the suspension arms is useful to keep the tires from flat spotting. Standing with the suspension arms hanging is not so great. If not putting on stands having enough space to come and roll the car a foot or so forward or back to change the tire contact spots will help with flat spotting as well. If the tires flat spot some they will usually straighten themselves back out with a little (maybe bumpy initially) driving when the car is brought back out. Some moth balls can help keep unwanted pest at bay. Make sure heater hoses are in good shaped or blocking any openings in the heater system is a good idea to keep rodents out.
Corvair guy since 1982. I have personally restored at least 20 Vairs, many of them restored ground up.
Currently working full time repairing Corvairs and restoring old cars.
https://www.facebook.com/tedsautorestoration/

Located in Snellville, Georgia

stableclips
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Re: New owner with question

Post by stableclips »

Boy, great responses, thank you both very much. I will be keeping the car inside a garage all winter and not driving it in the snow at all. I was a kid sweeping floors at a Chevrolet dealership when one of the owners bought a brand new 1963 Monza convertible with a 4 speed tranny. It was beautiful and I always wanted to get one. I had a 1971 GTO for over 30 years that I gave to my daughter in July so the time was ripe. I found this Corvair in South Dakota and it seems to be in very good shape with what I would consider minor issues like some chrome trim dents, etc. I don't have any photos on my computer although I do on my cell phone and once I figure out how to transfer them over, I'll attach some.

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terribleted
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Re: New owner with question

Post by terribleted »

You should be able to use the full editor tab below and attach images from your phone.
Corvair guy since 1982. I have personally restored at least 20 Vairs, many of them restored ground up.
Currently working full time repairing Corvairs and restoring old cars.
https://www.facebook.com/tedsautorestoration/

Located in Snellville, Georgia

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Bruins_Fan
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Re: New owner with question

Post by Bruins_Fan »

Welcome to CF! The Corvair Forum app is pretty easy to use for posting pics. At least it is on an Android phone!
20201002_103024.jpeg
Sent from my SM-G975U1 using Corvair Forum mobile app


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'66 Monza Convertible 110hp Powerglide

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