New to Corvairs

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6Gun_Joe
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Joined: Thu May 18, 2017 4:56 am

New to Corvairs

Unread post by 6Gun_Joe » Fri May 19, 2017 4:40 pm

Hello. I'm from Chester County PA. I picked up a 64 Monza a while back, PO advertised it as a complete car just needing assembly, not quite but I now have most of the parts and it's almost driveable. Still needs some work and some paint but its getting there slowly.

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Last edited by 6Gun_Joe on Fri May 19, 2017 4:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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toytron
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Re: New to Corvairs

Unread post by toytron » Wed May 24, 2017 4:15 pm

Welcome Joe!

Ed Stevenson

Edwin Stevenson
Industrial Electrician
Electronics Technician
65 corvair corsa convertible turbo
65 corvair monza

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bbodie52
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Re: New to Corvairs

Unread post by bbodie52 » Wed May 24, 2017 5:03 pm

:wave: :welcome2: Welcome to the Corvair Forum!

It is hard to tell from the one photograph, but your 1964 Corvair looks to be relatively clean. The biggest concern with the car that has "lived" in the Pennsylvania area would be body rot and rust. Have you had a chance to examine the body thoroughly for rust damage? Corvairs are constructed of unibody design, which means they have no real frame. The body serves as the frame. There are sub-frames for mounting the front and rear suspension and powertrain, but these sub-frames are attached to the body, and the body provides the overall structural support for the car. It is important that you examine your car thoroughly for hidden damage or for damage that may have been covered up with plastic body filler. It may be worthwhile to pay a body shop to have one of their skilled technicians perform a "health examination" on your car so that you don't end up with any undesirable surprises. If your car proves to have a solid foundation, proceeding with mechanical repairs and cosmetic repairs throughout the car would certainly be a worthwhile investment. The 1964 Corvair was the beneficiary of five model years of enhancements and improvements — particularly to the front and rear suspension with an anti-sway bar in the front and a transverse leaf spring in the rear to improve handling and stability. The engine displacement was also increased in that model year from 145 CI to 164 CI. A magnesium cooling fan was also implemented in that year, which reduced stresses on the fan belt and improved fan belt reliability. What type of transmission is installed in your car?

I am familiar with your area. When I was still in the USAF I was transferred to Fort Indiantown Gap to work as an Air National Guard instructor. I lived in Lebanon Pennsylvania from 1993 until 2005. I had retired from the Air Force in 1996 and then worked for Pennsy Supply for nine years as a computer technician and network administrator. I moved to North Carolina in 2005 to care for my aging father and continue to remain in western North Carolina. I have been around Corvairs since 1961, when my parents purchased their first 1961 Corvair Monza. At the time I was eight years old. Over the years we have had 10 Corvairs in our family, and age 64 my wife and I still drive in 1966 Corsa convertible.

The link below will provide you with a list of useful websites that are Corvair-related. Some of the links will lead you to an extensive technical library that will allow you to download shop manuals and other technical references in Adobe Reader format at no cost. There is also a link that will help you to locate a nearby CORSA (Corvair Society of America) club chapter in Pennsylvania. While the Corvair Forum can be very helpful as you work on your Corvair, having local friends and contacts in your region who are knowledgeable about the Corvair can also be very helpful. These family-friendly CORSA chapters often offer picnics, group scenic drives, technical training and assistance, car shows, and competition events that can greatly enhance your enjoyment of Corvair ownership. You will also find a list of essential Corvair parts suppliers. Clark's Corvair Parts is the biggest and oldest Corvair supplier in the world. You will find a link that can provide you with a series of videos that amount to a tour of the Clark's Corvair Parts facilities. I think you will be amazed at the quality of the reproduction components they offer — particularly the interior carpeting and re-upholstery items. Parts suppliers such as this truly make our hobby possible.

Common and Useful Corvair Websites

:link: viewtopic.php?f=225&t=6007

:dontknow: I would like to encourage you to expand on your initial post and tell us more about yourself, your Corvair, and your goals for the Corvair. If you can describe your personal assessment of your mechanical skills and abilities, that would help a lot. Members of the Corvair Forum love to be helpful in assisting other Corvair owners with technical support and advice, but it helps a lot if we have some understanding of your technical background and mechanical abilities, Corvair-related knowledge, etc. Helping us to know more about you will help us to write comments to you that are tailored to your needs and experience. Knowing your location is also useful, because knowing where you live can sometimes suggest possibilities.

:welcome:
Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
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6Gun_Joe
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Joined: Thu May 18, 2017 4:56 am

Re: New to Corvairs

Unread post by 6Gun_Joe » Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:00 am

Thanks! I have been working on cars since in was 16, I'm 27 now. I am a CNC Machinist. I am pretty good at diagnosing and repairing automotive problems. I can do most repairs myself though I avoid complete engine rebuilds. I do not enjoy body work and am not very skilled at it.
My Corvair is a 64 but from my work on the engine I believe its from a 62 or 63. Its not a turbo car and it's automatic. It does have some rust here and there but the body is in good shape. My main goal is to get it on the road, I'm not worried so much about looks.
Hopefully that answered most of your questions. If not, let me know.

Sent from my LG-K550 using Corvair Forum mobile app


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bbodie52
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Re: New to Corvairs

Unread post by bbodie52 » Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:49 am

...My Corvair is a 64 but from my work on the engine I believe its from a 62 or 63...
I'm curious, what specifically about your engine gives you the impression that it is a 1962 or 1963? We may be able to help you to confirm this, if you would post one or more pictures of the details of your engine compartment. The photographs below may also be helpful to you. The first three photographs show the location of the engine serial number and the cylinder head casting number. The latter may be somewhat difficult to see because it may be blocked from view by engine sheet metal, but it can be found adjacent to the end of the valve cover, as shown in the picture. The serial number does not include a model year, but the last two digits (letters) helps to identify the engine. However, that two letter code often overlaps multiple model years. But it still could be a useful clue. The cylinder head casting number is more specific to one model year, so if you can get that from either head it might help to confirm the nature of your engine. Other characteristics like the cooling fan design and crankshaft pulley can also provide clues — but these components are easily transferable from one model year to the next so they may not be conclusive. After 50 years or so, Corvair engines often become a combination of parts from a wide range of engines. It sometimes takes a little detective work to truly determine exactly what you are working with. If you could post some photographs and detailed comments concerning your suspicions we could help you to confirm the engine in your car.

Engine cases usually have an engine serial number stamped near the top cover mounting area, near where the oil filter adapter mounts...

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You also mentioned that your main goal is to "get it on the road". If you could describe the condition of your car in more detail and post additional photographs of areas that are questionable or problematic you would likely receive many comments and suggestions from members of the Corvair Forum. The experience and background of many Corvair owners on the Corvair Forum may be useful to you. We like to help!

Speaking of help, have you considered contacting a local club chapter of CORSA (Corvair Society of America)? There are several club chapters scattered around Pennsylvania and in New Jersey. Club members can also be very helpful and can provide recommendations that are more specific to your area with regard to Corvair ownership. Technical training classes, car shows, competition events, and family-friendly things like picnics and scenic drives can all make Corvair ownership just that much more enjoyable. The link I provided earlier in my previous posts under the title "Common and Useful Websites" includes a link that will list all of the CORSA club chapters in America. Hopefully one or more of them is close to you.

I'm looking forward to hearing back from you and seeing more pictures of your car.
Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
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6Gun_Joe
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Joined: Thu May 18, 2017 4:56 am

Re: New to Corvairs

Unread post by 6Gun_Joe » Mon Jun 05, 2017 4:41 am

Don't have time to go into details right now but I took a few pictures. Thanks for the help and encouragement by the way.
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bbodie52
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Re: New to Corvairs

Unread post by bbodie52 » Mon Jun 05, 2017 7:51 am

T0601ZH
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T = Tonawanda, New York (GM Tonawanda Engine Plant)
http://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/comp ... wanda.html
0601 = Engine manufacturing date (month and date). June 1st.
ZH = Late 1961 - 80 HP Automatic Transmission (900 Monza Only)
ZH = 1962-1963 - 84 HP Automatic Transmission (900 Monza Only)

Based on the cooling fan type, crankshaft pulley, late distributor design (1962-1969), the location of the oil pressure sending unit (next to the generator, as found on late 1962-1963 engines), and automatic choke carburetors, the engine would appear to be 1962-1963. However, there is no Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system visible — indicating the presence of a Road Draft Tube. That would likely make it a 1962 engine.

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Brad Bodie
Lake Chatuge, North Carolina
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